Kenny Baker 1934 – 2016

Kenny Baker

24th August 1934 – 13th August 2016

“Artoo’s reply is a rather rude sound. He turns and trudges off in the direction of the towering mesas.”

Valley of Love – Film Review

Valley of Love

Gérard (Gérard Depardieu) and Isabelle (Isabelle Huppert) are a long divorced couple sent from their native France to California’s Death Valley by their son’s suicide note. He has asked them to spend the week together and put together a precise schedule for them to follow. Forced together after years apart the couple reminisce about their son and their marriage while an unsettling undercurrent runs through each scene.

The couple are visibly uncomfortable. Not only is the intense Californian heat almost too much to bear they are forced to confront their past and in what ways they might have let their son down. All the while spending time together with someone they chose to divorces decades before. Depardieu and Huppert are seasoned pros and tackle the low-key drama with aplomb. It is easy to believe there’s a real history between them and their conversation is filled with a relatable blend of tenderness and bitterness. If Valley of Love were just this, two great actors performing against a beautiful backdrop, then I would have loved the film. Sadly there was another element at play that muddied the waters.

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That unsettling undercurrent I mentioned earlier grew throughout the film and bloomed from a subtle element into something a little distracting. How do I phrase this? There was a hint of the other to the film; an exploration of the idea that death may not be the end. My issue is actually not that this idea was included in the film but that it wasn’t delved into a little deeper. As an emotional drama the film was complete but as the supernatural element felt unfinished and unsatisfying.

Again let me stress that my frustrations do not come from the performances. Everything about the two leads is authentic, heartbreaking, and subtle. Guillaume Nicloux as a director is also praiseworthy as he gives the actors room to perform whilst capturing the majestic landscape that lay behind them. Where my issues lie are with Nicloux’s script. Whilst excellent at the human element it fails to follow through on the unnecessary additional of otherworldly influences.

It could have been perfect but instead was sullied by a bold idea half executed.

Valley of Love is in UK cinemas now.

Men and Chicken – Film Review

Men and Chicken

Mads Mikkelsen is a fine figure of a man and I am sure his cheekbones have been praised on these pages before now. As Hannibal he is the ultimate in suave as the serial killer who never dresses down or has a hair out of place. Let this film be a testament to his skills then as he takes on a role as a decidedly non-suave, crumpled, socially awkward, and just plain odd man.

Mikkelsen and David Dencik play a pair of half-brothers who discover upon their father’s death that he was not their real father. On a mission to find their real father and information about their respective mothers the pair travel to a remote Danish island and find far more than they bargained for. With their father confined to his bed the brothers have to instead spend time with a surprise new trio of half-brothers, each more bizarre than the last, and sleep in a house filled with chickens, pigs, sheep, a bull, and a lot of cheese.

During their stay the now five brother struggle for dominance and our original duo fight to discover just what is going on; what happened to their mothers and what secrets their father is keeping in the locked basement.

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Men & Chicken is a deliciously dark comedy surrounding five disturbed individuals trying to get along. Fans of Danish television will be delighted to see Mikkelsen alongside the likes of Søren Malling, Nikolaj Lie Kaas, Nicholas Bro, and Ole Thestrup in a feature far less serious than their usual fare. There are plenty of laughs to be had as the film is filled with slapstick violence alongside surprisingly dry humour. Eventually though certain strands of comedy wear a little thin and you fear what you might be forced to witness. Suffice it to say that the big reveal was actually more grim than I had anticipated.

This is my first experience of the work of writer and director Anders Thomas Jensen so I can’t compare it to his previous work but viewed in isolation this was a fun comedy, just not one I am likely to return to.

I admire the film’s tenacity but ultimately can’t fully get behind it. I feel like I should like it more that I did but there is a point at which bestiality and masturbation stops making me laugh. Spoilsport I know.

Men and Chicken screens again on the 10th and 18th and tickets are still available online.

Anton Yelchin 1989 – 2016

Anton Yelchin

11th March 1989 – 19th June 2016

“The ability to have a choice in what you do is a privilege.”

Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story) – Film Review

Bang Gang

In a French suburb a Bang Gang is formed; a group of teens who meet up to party and have orgies. This being an era in which everyone carries a camera in their pocket they share photos from their events online and it is only a matter of time before the news leaks and STDs spread.

Bang Gang is the debut feature from Eva Husson and there is a lot to admire about her work. The imagery of the film is gorgeous and she has coaxed naturalist, and appropriately brave, performances from her young, and mostly amateur, actors. This is an attention grabbing first film but sadly it doesn’t manage to smuggle in any surprises amongst all the attractive naked people.

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Once you are over the shock and titillation of teenage orgies there is not much left to Bang Gang. There are some friendships that become rivalries and a sweet potential romance between a quiet boy and a betrayed girl but for the most part the film plays out exactly at you might expect. Lots of fun is had and then people have to face the consequences. I don’t what else to say.

Maybe I am missing something. There is a heavy emphasis on hamsters and train derailment (not at the same time) so perhaps there is some symbolism going over my head? As it is I just saw Bang Gang as a very stylish feature-length episode of Skins. I will certainly keep my eye on the future work of Husson but won’t be returning to her debut.

If you choose to see the film after reading this review then we’ll all know you’re just going for the sex.