The Purge: Election Year – Film Review

The Purge Election Year

In 2013 we were introduced to the concept of The Purge via a moderately OK home invasion thriller. In the near future America has followed through to its natural conclusion and holds an annual event in which all laws are suspended for twelve hours. Everything is legal from murder to… murder. The films never really explore my other crimes. An interesting concept wasted was the critical consensus and yet a franchise was born.

Just over a year later and a sequel had been knocked together. The Purge: Anarchy is not a perfect film either but at least took the feedback on board and ventured outside of a single house to see the carnage outside. Frank Grillo played a grieving father out on Purge Night to avenge his son’s death. Instead of wreaking revenge he finds himself defending the vulnerable and learning from Edwin Hodge’s resistance fighter that The Purge is essentially a way for the rich to cull the lower classes. Once again we have a concept more interesting that the film containing it.

And so to The Purge: Election Year. Grillo is back and this time his character has a name and a job! I won’t bog you down in details like his name but his job is pivotal to the plot. Grillo is now the bodyguard of a Senator played by Elizabeth Mitchell. She is coming close to winning the US election and has pledged to end The Purge if she gets into office. Naturally the elites who thrive on The Purge aren’t happy to let her win and use Purge Night to launch an assassination attempt.

Before too long Grillo and the Senator are on the streets just trying to stay alive as they stumble across numerous drama students wearing masks, loaded with blood packs, and armed with overly arch dialogue. Along the way the pair meet up with a ragtag bunch of other survivors who want to bring down the existing government by foul means or fair. What follows are a series of events, some schlocky acting, and a dramatic showdown in a church.

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Can they all survive the night? Will the Senator give into base instincts or can she win on principles alone? Is this film racist? All important questions I am sure you will agree.

More than ever these films feel incredibly prescient. Considering the climate in America surrounding Donald Trump and separately the Black Lives Matter movement it seems like the right time for a film exploring what happens when tyrants rule and people are killed based on their social grade. Whether this films succeeds in exploring these issues is another matter. Sadly the film just feels weighed down by its attempt at importance and takes itself too seriously when it should be having fun.

When the laughs do come they tend to be at the expense of the film or, more worryingly, in response to some of the dialogue. The films heart lies with Mykelti Williamson who plays a shopkeeper that Grillo and chums fight alongside. Williamson is a self-made man who just wants to defend his store and he does so with a series of one liners that had the audience laughing in astonishment. Williamson is given dialogue that could only have been written by a white screenwriter, James DeMonaco, writing for a black actor. I felt a similar sense of unease to when I saw The Hateful Eight and shuddered as the room of largely white males laughed as the N-word was bandied about and women were hit in the face.

A sample line of dialogue: “There are a whole bunch of Negros coming this way. and we’re looking like a big ol’ bucket of fried chicken.” There’s no way I can hear that line followed by a loud belly laugh without feeling deeply uneasy.

On the surface The Purge: Election Year is a harmless action horror with some interesting ideas bubbling away at its depths. Look too close and instead you find a cheaply made sequel that squanders its premise and betrays its diverse cast.

Valley of Love – Film Review

Valley of Love

Gérard (Gérard Depardieu) and Isabelle (Isabelle Huppert) are a long divorced couple sent from their native France to California’s Death Valley by their son’s suicide note. He has asked them to spend the week together and put together a precise schedule for them to follow. Forced together after years apart the couple reminisce about their son and their marriage while an unsettling undercurrent runs through each scene.

The couple are visibly uncomfortable. Not only is the intense Californian heat almost too much to bear they are forced to confront their past and in what ways they might have let their son down. All the while spending time together with someone they chose to divorces decades before. Depardieu and Huppert are seasoned pros and tackle the low-key drama with aplomb. It is easy to believe there’s a real history between them and their conversation is filled with a relatable blend of tenderness and bitterness. If Valley of Love were just this, two great actors performing against a beautiful backdrop, then I would have loved the film. Sadly there was another element at play that muddied the waters.

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That unsettling undercurrent I mentioned earlier grew throughout the film and bloomed from a subtle element into something a little distracting. How do I phrase this? There was a hint of the other to the film; an exploration of the idea that death may not be the end. My issue is actually not that this idea was included in the film but that it wasn’t delved into a little deeper. As an emotional drama the film was complete but as the supernatural element felt unfinished and unsatisfying.

Again let me stress that my frustrations do not come from the performances. Everything about the two leads is authentic, heartbreaking, and subtle. Guillaume Nicloux as a director is also praiseworthy as he gives the actors room to perform whilst capturing the majestic landscape that lay behind them. Where my issues lie are with Nicloux’s script. Whilst excellent at the human element it fails to follow through on the unnecessary additional of otherworldly influences.

It could have been perfect but instead was sullied by a bold idea half executed.

Valley of Love is in UK cinemas now.

Men and Chicken – Film Review

Men and Chicken

Mads Mikkelsen is a fine figure of a man and I am sure his cheekbones have been praised on these pages before now. As Hannibal he is the ultimate in suave as the serial killer who never dresses down or has a hair out of place. Let this film be a testament to his skills then as he takes on a role as a decidedly non-suave, crumpled, socially awkward, and just plain odd man.

Mikkelsen and David Dencik play a pair of half-brothers who discover upon their father’s death that he was not their real father. On a mission to find their real father and information about their respective mothers the pair travel to a remote Danish island and find far more than they bargained for. With their father confined to his bed the brothers have to instead spend time with a surprise new trio of half-brothers, each more bizarre than the last, and sleep in a house filled with chickens, pigs, sheep, a bull, and a lot of cheese.

During their stay the now five brother struggle for dominance and our original duo fight to discover just what is going on; what happened to their mothers and what secrets their father is keeping in the locked basement.

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Men & Chicken is a deliciously dark comedy surrounding five disturbed individuals trying to get along. Fans of Danish television will be delighted to see Mikkelsen alongside the likes of Søren Malling, Nikolaj Lie Kaas, Nicholas Bro, and Ole Thestrup in a feature far less serious than their usual fare. There are plenty of laughs to be had as the film is filled with slapstick violence alongside surprisingly dry humour. Eventually though certain strands of comedy wear a little thin and you fear what you might be forced to witness. Suffice it to say that the big reveal was actually more grim than I had anticipated.

This is my first experience of the work of writer and director Anders Thomas Jensen so I can’t compare it to his previous work but viewed in isolation this was a fun comedy, just not one I am likely to return to.

I admire the film’s tenacity but ultimately can’t fully get behind it. I feel like I should like it more that I did but there is a point at which bestiality and masturbation stops making me laugh. Spoilsport I know.

Men and Chicken screens again on the 10th and 18th and tickets are still available online.

Queen of Earth – Film Review

Queen of Earth

Catherine (Elisabeth Moss) is in a troubled place. Left by her boyfriend a few months after her revered artist father committed suicide, she looks for solace in her old friend Ginny (Katherine Waterston) and a lakeside retreat. Bad choice. Catherine is with the last person who can help her come to terms with the tragedies that have come her way, while arguably, Ginny has no good reason to offer help in the first place.

I knew almost nothing about this film before seeing it, only that it was a low-budget drama led by two women, pretty much putting it in my wheelhouse. Another Martha Marcy May Marlene, maybe? I was excited!

Queen of Earth switches its timeframe between Catherine and Ginny’s present break in the cottage and their equivalent stay the year before. It shows how their actions on the first holiday have had consequences for the second and Waterson and Moss both put in thoughtful performances of two friends who really shouldn’t be any more.

Everything about the film is designed to maximise your discomfort. From too-close shots of people’s faces that make you want to physically lean away from them, to the suspenseful music that never once lets up. By the end of the film I was exhausted from being bullied into feeling tense for the whole 90 minutes. Despite the score’s hard work though, I was frequently bored.

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Long monologues – expositional turnings over of past, personality-shaping relationships – can easily be imagined in the context of a conversation with real-life friends who are trying to analyse how they got to where they are now. However, they’re just tedious when you are the spectator of characters who you don’t even like. Without exception, I grew to loathe everyone on screen, as the behaviour of both main and supporting characters pushed the believable boundaries of what a person would be willing to put up with from their ‘friends’, let alone strangers. Despite the strength of the lead actors, the script failed to convince me that Catherine and Ginny were ever friends in the first place and so I had nothing on which to hang my belief that they’d be willing to endure each other’s unpleasantness now. It was also surprising how, for a film that almost never leaves these two women, it struggled to pass the Bechdel Test.

It isn’t hard to imagine this as a very different review. A parallel-universe me could be praising Queen of Earth for its suspense, dark reading of interpersonal relationships and insightful portrayal of depression. Sadly, in this universe Queen of Earth left me frustrated and worn-out, and no amount of admiring the craft can mitigate that.

There is an interesting film to be made about growing away from your old friendships but not breaking the bond. I don’t think this is it.

Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story) – Film Review

Bang Gang

In a French suburb a Bang Gang is formed; a group of teens who meet up to party and have orgies. This being an era in which everyone carries a camera in their pocket they share photos from their events online and it is only a matter of time before the news leaks and STDs spread.

Bang Gang is the debut feature from Eva Husson and there is a lot to admire about her work. The imagery of the film is gorgeous and she has coaxed naturalist, and appropriately brave, performances from her young, and mostly amateur, actors. This is an attention grabbing first film but sadly it doesn’t manage to smuggle in any surprises amongst all the attractive naked people.

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Once you are over the shock and titillation of teenage orgies there is not much left to Bang Gang. There are some friendships that become rivalries and a sweet potential romance between a quiet boy and a betrayed girl but for the most part the film plays out exactly at you might expect. Lots of fun is had and then people have to face the consequences. I don’t what else to say.

Maybe I am missing something. There is a heavy emphasis on hamsters and train derailment (not at the same time) so perhaps there is some symbolism going over my head? As it is I just saw Bang Gang as a very stylish feature-length episode of Skins. I will certainly keep my eye on the future work of Husson but won’t be returning to her debut.

If you choose to see the film after reading this review then we’ll all know you’re just going for the sex.