Film4 Summer Screen at Somerset House 2011 Line-up Revealed

Yesterday Somerset House released the list of films in this year’s Film4 Summer Screen. We missed out last year and frankly I can’t figure out why. With the amazing line-up this year I can imagine a fair few trips will be made.

Things worth getting silly about are a Die Hard and Attack the Block double bill, Scott Pilgrim vs The World and The Princess Bride. Possibly most exciting of all is a Gremlins, Troll Hunter and Tremors triple bill. Watch this trailer if you aren’t excited by this idea.

Before each screening is an hour-long talk from the Behind the Screen series, well worth a look as they have the likes of Joe Cornish in attendance.

The full schedule of films is below and we’d love to see you there sitting on the floor, outdoors and at night, among fellow film fans and quality cinema.

The Skin I Live In: UK Premiere
Wednesday 27 July 2011

The Spy Who Loved Me
Thursday 28 July 2011

The Big Blue
Friday 29 July 2011

Die Hard / Attack The Block
Saturday 30 July 2011

The Apartment
Sunday 31 July 2011

Thelma & Louise
Monday 1 August 2010

Chinatown
Tuesday 2 August 2011

In The Mood For Love
Wednesday 3 August 2011

Scott Pilgrim vs The World
Thursday 4 August 2011

Serpico / Shaft
Friday 5 August 2011

Gremlins / Troll Hunter / Tremors
Saturday 6 August 2011

The Princess Bride
Sunday 7 August 2011

Tickets can be bought online from Thursday 9th June and will sell fast.

Attack the Block – Clips and Featurettes

This is our final push to make you see Attack the Block and marvel at its goodness. If you’re still not convinced or have already seen it and would love to see a collection of videos aimed at making people see the film, then click on below. There’s a mix of character profiles, behind the scenes with Cornish, clips and a trailer.

After this we have nothing more for you. For stills and posters go here. Continue reading

Attack the Block – Stills and Posters

Have you seen Attack the Block yet? Don’t be put off by the fact that Robbie Collins, the man from every film poster ever, describes the film as “utter bollocks” because everyone else seems to love it. Occasionally I worry about being blinded by love for writer/director Joe Cornish and being far too biased. But SXSW loved it, and they can’t all be Adam & Joe fans, right?

This post isn’t about my crisis of faith, it is about pictures from a movie that you may or may not want.

Below are all the promotional images we could get our hands on. Click on any image to get it full sized and decorate your laptop, smartphone or, if you must, your iPad. (Can iPads have backgrounds?) Continue reading

Out Now – 11th May 2011

You lucky things should get yourselves down to your local independent cinema tonight and watch today’s only release. We loved it, Robbie Collins hated it, which seat should you take?

Attack the Block
Aliens invade a South London council estate in Joe Cornish’s confident and punchy debut. Let’s hope Adam Buxton has got plenty of hobbies as his comedy partner is sure to be busy in the years to come. Saturday morning radio’s loss is cinema’s gain.

To harass you up to the weekend we will be shoving all the promo material we have down your throats over the next few days, enjoy.

Attack the Block – Review

As he briefly introduced the film last night Joe Cornish described Attack the Block as a first time for everyone involved; for himself, for the cinematographer, for Basement Jaxx and Steven Price producing the score and for the 11 young actors bearing the brunt of the film. But from the opening shot as we move down from the nights sky to Oval tube station it is clear that this is not the work of amateurs.

Joe Cornish is no stranger to writing, he’s currently going from writing for Spielberg to writing for Marvel, so it’s no surprise he has managed to produce a funny and action filled script. What is surprising is the dialogue of the gang who discover, and try to fight off, an alien invasion on their block of flats. It’s something that caused me major concern in the trailer and the clips that were released but in the context of the film is not nearly so jarring. You can see Cornish did his research, something highlighted by just how awkward it sounds when Luke Treadaway’s Brewis, more private school than council estate, tries to pull off the dialogue himself.

As a director Cornish keeps his camera moving in a slow and steady style, there’s never so much shaky cam or fast editing that you can’t tell what’s going on. Cornish is happy to let the visuals get the attention they’re due, and the fact that such cinematic visuals are possible in a block of flats is down to Thomas Townend in his first feature as cinematographer. Townend makes the most of dark corners, harsh strip lighting and smoke to create a series of eerie and beautiful images.

Basement Jaxx and Steven Price’s debut score provides the usual necessary functions of making the scary moments scary and the tense moments tense but adds another unique layer. This is no orchestral score and the Jaxx-esque music playing throughout reflects more the culture of the kids involved, adding to the setting rather than taking you out of the film. Danny Elfman would have ruined it.

Moving swiftly on to the conclusion of this review, brilliantly set up structurally in the opening paragraph, let’s talk about the real stars of the film: the stars of the film. As mentioned, Luke Treadaway provides some solid comic relief as the outsider trying to look cool and fit in with the gang of youths. The very gang of youths that had not acted before but became the heart and soul of the film. Terrifying, funny and heroic in equal measure throughout the film, the gang of young tearaways go from petty crime to alien warfare and we go right along with them. As their mugging victim, Sam (Jodie Whittaker), learns to stop fearing and judging the group, we do too and by the end we’re right by their side, kitchen knife in hand. Special mention goes to Alex Esmail as Pest for making me love a character I know and dislike in real life.

It’s hard to be totally objective when I’ve been taught to love the work of Adam and Joe in the past year but there’s no denying this is a great, thrill ride of a film and a confident debut by all involved. This film is a powerhouse, particularly for a low budget British monster movie, all the skill behind the camera makes up for any lack of budget, the aliens themselves a testament to ingenuity over cost.

Now as a treat for anyone who is still reading, a clip featuring Mr Joe Cornish:

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