Black Mass – LFF Review

Black Mass

Black Mass tells of the career in crime of Boston’s James ‘Whitey’ Bulger (Johnny Depp), FBI agent John Connolly (Joel Edgerton) whom he corrupts, and various other individuals who help him out or get in his way. The cast is filled with names and those names are all fully bewigged and giving their best Boston accent. Performances are generally good, the period detail is on point, and events unfold as the events unfolded.

I did not enjoy it.

Watching Black Mass was a relatively empty experience. Over the course of two hours so much happened and yet so little seemed to matter. Numerous characters were introduced only to be killed after a scene or simply forgotten about. The criminal elements were constantly discussing details of crimes or people that needing killing in a way that had no impact on the plot and so were not remotely interesting. In fact I don’t think there really was a plot. Whitey was a bad man and that’s about it.

Black Mass 2

The good guys are mostly in the background despite being portrayed by the likes of Kevin Bacon and Adam Scott. Black Mass took no great interest in the mechanics of their investigation preferring to simply get across the fact that they were vaguely interested in arresting Whitey and leaving it at that. Without anyone to root for I was just left resenting most of the people onscreen and eventually the screen itself.

And the women? What women? I counted at best three female actors in what could be considered major parts; Juno Temple, Dakota Johnson, and Julianne Nicholson. Of these three, two are forgotten about and never given an actual ending while the third is added to the body count after just two scenes.

Black Mass is a continuous cycle of murder, money, talking, murder, money, and talking with a sprinkling of Benedict Cumberbatch as Whitey’s brother sticking out like a sore thumb. The events of the film may well be true but they are not presented in a remotely interesting way. Violence and crime without context are can be incredibly dull.

Expect some buzz around the performances but don’t believe the hype. There is nothing new to see here and your time could be better spent elsewhere.

Black Mass screens at the festival on the 11th, 12th and 16th October and a few tickets can still be found online.

Calculate six degrees of Kevin Bacon

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Type in any actor’s name followed by Bacon number.

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For the Love of Footloose, The Story of a Modern Dance Classic

1984 has always been a year synonymous with the idea of oppression and the rebellion against it. For many this is down to George Orwell’s classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, featuring a hypothetical future Big Brother state and Winston Smith, a man who is sick of obeying every rule and wants to turn it loose. When 1984 finally came round one film embodied the spirit of Orwell’s dystopia with a dance twist. That film was Footloose, with its oppressive small town where music and dancing were banned. All it took was one man, Ren McCormack as played by Kevin Bacon, to arrive with the passion and drive to try to organise the greatest rebellion of all: a prom. The plot may sound a bit ridiculous but in true “you couldn’t make this up” fashion, it is based on a true story.

As Winston Smith battled against the Ministry of Truth, Ren McCormack came up against Reverend Shaw Moore (the eternally fantastic John Lithgow). Both Ren and Winston were fighting for their freedom, the freedom to think, the freedom to dance and, ultimately, the freedom to love. In the end only one of these rebels was successful, the other left with a broken spirit and no burning, no yearning and no urge to tear up the town.

Both set in 1984, both about oppressed individuals fighting an unfair system, but only Footloose has the uplifting ending with a bit of a scuffle followed by crazy dancing and a tender moment in a field. Worth noting that Nineteen Eighty-Four did have a tender moment in a forest but I’d happily go so far as to say that Nineteen Eighty-Four is a bit of a downer, great literature certainly, but for a great bit of cinema it has to be Footloose.*

Bizarrely for a film dealing with sexuality and violence, for its UK cinema release Footloose accepted almost three minutes of cuts so that the BBFC would grant it a PG rating. In America similar edits were made to bring the rating down from an R to a PG. Thankfully these scenes, including love interest and preacher’s daughter Ariel being beaten by her boyfriend and Ren being offered a joint, were reinstated for the VHS, DVD and now Blu-ray releases, along with some male nudity for the ladies.

Sadly Footloose was not a huge hit with the critics and still only has a 57%** fresh rating at Rotten Tomatoes. If only we were eligible we could bring that up to 58%; trust me, I’ve done the maths. America’s most respected film critic Roger Ebert gave the film just one and a half stars out of four (not five, he’s wacky that way) and his review can be summed up in its opening sentence, “Footloose is a seriously confused movie that tries to do three things, and does all of them badly.” For context, he did give The Phantom Menace three and a half stars, so I suppose no critic is right all of the time. Sadly the UK’s greatest film critic, Mark Kermode, doesn’t have a review I can find but did recently call it a “guilty pleasure and a half”.

Regardless of the critics reaction, Footloose was a success. Made for just over $8 million Footloose recouped its budget in its opening weekend where it took the top spot at the box office, a position it held for a total of three weeks. Over its eighteen weeks in cinemas Footloose was in the top ten for all but two weeks. Compare that with a more modern dance film and they simply do not measure up; I blame a lack of plot and a major hole where Kevin Bacon doing an angry dance should be.

Not just a commercial success, Footloose also picked up two Oscar nominations for best song, for “Footloose” and “Let’s Hear It for the Boy”. Both songs, along with many others on the soundtrack, were written especially for the film by Dean Pitchford the Footloose screenwriter. No wonder the background music always sounded so perfect for the scene.

Since its original release Footloose has been made into a stage musical in 1999, a show that can still be found in the village halls of Cornwall if nowhere else. The impact of the film can be felt further afield than this theatrical adaptation as popular culture is littered with references to the 1984 classic. We recently made a video (found on YouTube) collecting 41 references and homages to Footloose, a true testament to the longevity of this film. My personal favourite being an episode of Flight of the Conchords where one character dances in a barn in true Kevin Bacon style (embedded below). Worth noting too is that in the month since compiling these clips, at least two more references have been made in US TV shows making my video instantly redundant.

Not content with a classic 80’s film and a West End and Broadway musical, in 2007/2008 Paramount announced that they would make a musical remake of Footloose. This film was originally to come from High School Musical‘s director Kenny Ortega and star Zac Efron, but both eventually left the project. In 2010 these were then replaced by Craig Brewer and Kenny Wormald respectively and at this point the film moved from being a musical to a more straightforward remake as Brewer details in a recent interview. After much trepidation on this fan’s part the film is finally out tomorrow and it still remains to be seen whether it matches the original or not. Either way it is important to remember that no remake can tarnish an original work. We will always have the 1984 version of Footloose, and it will never stop being a joy to watch.

Footloose may have a corny plot but I can unequivocally say that it is my favourite film. Hopefully with the attention drawn to it by the remake we can get a few more people to enjoy this cheesy piece of 80’s dance cinema and then can shut up about it once and for all.

*Not everyone at Mild Concern agrees with this for some reason.
**Down from the 59% it was at a few days ago when I started this post, thanks to this guy.

The Only Blu-ray You’ll Ever Need

Back in 1984 a film came out with a ridiculous plot, infectious soundtrack and brought Kevin Bacon angst-dancing into the spotlight. Few films can bring me as much joy as Footloose and I am very excited that it is out on Blu-ray today.

Sadly we haven’t been sent a copy to review, but a quick look at the list of special features below reveals a huge, and recent, involvement from Kevin Bacon. It is a testament to the greatest film ever made that the star has still not turned his back on one of his earlier films, something our Supercut proved too.

Footloose is available to buy on Blu-ray now, and if you’re feeling stingy can be picked up on DVD for less that £3. You’d be mad not to.

Special Features

  • Commentary by Kevin Bacon
  • Commentary by Producer Craig Zadan and Writer Dean Pitchford
  • Let’s Dance! Kevin Bacon on Footloose
  • From Bomont to the Big Apple: An Interview with Sarah Jessica Parker
  • Remembering Willard
  • Kevin Bacon’s Screen Test
  • Kevin Bacon Costume Montage
  • Footloose: A Modern Musical – Part 1
  • Footloose: A Modern Musical – Part 2
  • Footloose: Songs That Tell A Story
  • Theatrical Trailer

Footloose – The Supercut Loose!

Oh dear, how to begin…

While re-watching 3rd Rock from the Sun I noticed the occasional nods to Footloose, either with John Lithgow parodying his own role or simply with a song from the film used in the show. This got me wondering how often Footloose has been referenced over the years since the film’s release in 1984. After a trip to IMDb and a plea for references on Twitter I had my list.

With the supercut craze at its peak I figured a video collecting as many Footloose references/homages would be a worthwhile use of my time. Here’s the result:

What really spurred this on is my love for Footloose and disdain for the remake coming out one month today. Surely any film still permeating throughout popular culture 27 years after it’s release should remain untouched. If anything, Footloose has become more popular over time, though sadly this makes it even more ripe for remaking than if it had faded away into cinematic history.

If this video does anything I hope it pushes you to watch Kevin Bacon dance his feet loose in the 1984 original Footloose. And if any London cinemas are reading, why not screen the film this October? If ever there was a time to celebrate the original Footloose it is when it can run alongside this:

Bonus Footloose reference facts:

  • The busiest year for Footloose nods was 2007 with 7 references spread over 6 TV series and 1 film.
  • Both John Lithgow and Kevin Bacon have appeared in two different TV series a piece which reference the film, both times Bacon played himself while Lithgow took on different roles.
  • David Spade and Seth MacFarlane are the only two non-Footloose actors to reference the film in more than one TV show. For Spade these were 8 years apart and MacFarlane referenced the film with three different characters across two shows.
  • Gilmore Girls holds the distinction of the most episodes with a Footloose reference with five in total. The show also held the Footloose torch love by itself from 2001 to 2003 and contained the most references per year in 2003.

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